Rittle, 1981

Thetheorythat underpins this research study is self-perception. 315 experimental subjects were contacted at their homes in Chicago, in connection withparticipating. The procedures, included two randomly selected groups, further divided into two conditions. Subjects were either offered, or not offered an incentive to comply with a request. The message was a request to place a small sign in a window of each home, promoting recycling as a means of resource conservation. It read "CONSERVE RESOURCES-RECYCLE". Two weeks later a second request was made of the same groups, some were moderate requests others were large. Measurement of attribution was administered to test the process of self perception. The resultsfound no difference in the compliance of the groups with the first initial request. However, making such a request, without offering an incentive enhanced the likelihood of positive behavioral intentions for subsequent moderate and/or large requests.The implications of this study are that the foot-in-the-door approach, is more effective in producing behavioral persistence than incentive strategies.


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SRS Theory Topics


Seligman, Bush, & Kirsch, 1976

Thetheorythat underpins this research study is self-perception. 119 randomly selected adults, were used asparticipants. The procedures, included an experimental and control condition; subjects were asked to respond to a telephone survey withmessages concerning, the energy crisis, and inflation. Several days later, this procedure was repeated, with a request that the participants once again answer questions.Measurement of compliance was crucial . The resultsfound that only large initial requests produced a significantly greater degree of compliance, than a no-first-request condition. The Return to SRS Dimensions Page


SRS Theory Topics


Scott, 1976

Thetheorythat underpins this research study is self-perception. 315 experimental subjects were contacted at their homes in Chicago, in connection withparticipating. The procedures, included two randomly selected groups, further divided into two conditions. Subjects were either offered, or not offered an incentive to comply with a request. The message was a request to place a small sign in a window of each home, promoting recycling as a means of resource conservation. It read "CONSERVE RESOURCES-RECYCLE". Two weeks later a second request was made of the same groups, some were moderate requests others were large. Measurement of attribution was administered to test the process of self perception. The resultsfound no difference in the compliance of the groups with the first initial request. However, making such a request, without offering an incentive enhanced the likelihood of positive behavioral intentions for subsequent moderate and/or large requests.The implications of this study are that the foot-in-the-door approach, is more effective in producing behavioral persistence than incentive strategies.


Return to SRS Dimensions Page