ENGL 105 Syllabus

Section 3. Spring 1996. T-Th 11:30-12:45.
Meet in MAC Lab, 236 Stansbury
Dr. Brady (Stansbury 433)


Phone: 293-3107 x 438
Campus Mailbox: Stansbury 231
Office Hours: 2:15-3:00 p.m. T/Th in my office in 433 Stansbury; other times by appointment.


E-mail to lbrady@wvu.edu

REQUIRED TEXTS/MATERIALS

RECOMMENDED: Webster's on-line dictionary and an

PRE-REQUISITES

English 1 & 2. Freshmen should not register for this course.


COURSE OBJECTIVES

We will work primarily on analyzing and developing effective strategies for business communication. By discussing successful communication strategies and practicing them in a variety of common business forms--letters, memos, proposals, formal reports--you will learn to analyze different writing contexts, meet the needs of an audience, organize and present material logically and clearly. We will spend most of our time working on ways to meet the needs of readers such as managers, customers, employees, etc. We will use computers and the internet for a majority of the work in this course. Use of HTML will be encouraged, but not required.


CLASS MEETINGS

. This section of Business English operates differently than other sections because it includes a large computer component. As a result, the structure of the class meetings differs from the other sections. We will meet as a regular class for the first two weeks of the semester. This will give everyone a chance to get an e-mail account and to explore the computer labs and resources on campus. During these initial class sessions, we will also be working on the first set of assignments (the direct plan portfolio). I'll expect everyone to attend both Tuesday and Thursday for the first two weeks. In addition to attending class, you'll need to sign up for an individual conference with me. Starting week 3 (Tues., Sept. 3) our class will meet in the computer lab in 236 Stansbury. From Sept. 3 through Oct. 3 (mid-term), you must attend class once a week. During these weeks we will be working on the internet for the next two sets of assignments (portfolios 2 & 3).

After mid-term (10/3), I will be in the computer lab every Tuesday and Thursday during class time so that you can count on lab space and my help, but you may, if you prefer, work independently in the other computer labs on campus or from home via modem. You must, however, make a point of logging on regularly to your e-mail account to keep current with correspondence from me, group members, or the class discussion list. I expect everyone to check their mail at least every other day. I will also expect you to show up the last day of classes (12/5) to fill out a course evaluation. Your response to the computer section of this course is extremely important to me.


ATTENDANCE

If you fail to meet any of the following attendance requirements, it will negatively affect your final grade.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Hand in all assignments on time. Since the class allows you quite a bit of flexibility, the deadlines for drafts and final portfolios of work are absolute. I will not accept late assignments. You are welcome to submit work up to two weeks early. (Thus, you could potentially complete this course before Thanksgiving.) If I do not receive an assignment in class on or before the date it is due, that assignment will receive an F and will not be eligible for revision. Portfolios are due on or before the start of class during weeks 3, 5, 8, 11, and 16.
  2. Do all of the assigned readings/preparations. You must complete all of the portfolios to be eligible for a passing grade.
  3. Attend the required class sessions listed above.
  4. Check your e-mail at least once every 48 hours. (Ideally, check it once a day.)
  5. Participate in the on-line discussion list for this class. (Ideally, subscribe to another list, too.)

GRADING POLICY

For a C, a document must meet the requirements of the assignment and have no more than 5 errors in punctuation, grammar, format, and spelling. For a B, no more than 2 such errors, with challenging content. An A represents outstanding work. Ds are reserved for unsatisfactory work and Fs for work that is unacceptable.

I do not give rades of "incomplete." The only exception is for cases of unexpected or unpredictable physical or psychological trauma that occur during the last two weeks of the semester. Certification from the Dean of Student Life is required.


ASSIGNMENT OVERVIEW

Expect to do some kind of writing every night for this course. The assignments fall into six categories:
  1. DIRECT PLAN PORTFOLIO [Responses to various cases, along with analyses of the writing contexts; worth about 10%]

  2. WORLD WIDE WEB PORTFOLIO [Collecting and evaluating sites; developing readability criteria; exploring possibilities for combining e-mail and internet resources; worth about 20%]

  3. EMPLOYMENT PORTFOLIO [Corporate research on the internet; resume, cover letter, context analysis; worth about 20%]

  4. INDIRECT PLAN PORTFOLIO [Responses to various cases, along with analyses of the writing contexts; worth about 20%]

  5. PROJECT PORTFOLIO [Worth about 25%] Includes:
    • context notes
    • proposal
    • progress reports
    • report
    • executive summary
    • letter of transmittal
    • NOTE: This portfolio is not eligible for the revision option.
  6. On-Line Discussion Group. [Worth 5%] I will regularly post questions that connect to the weekly readings. Each week I will assign a different group of people to respond to the weekly questions. You can expect to be called on for a response at least twice during the semester. Responses should, in general, be about 10 lines long (a decent paragraph). I encourage additional responses and will consider extra credit for thoughtful, regular contributions to the list.

REVISION POLICY

With the exception of the report portfolio, you may choose to revise and re- submit any two of the other four portfolios for a higher grade. Note: revisions are due one week from the date I return the original. Initial deadlines fall on Thursdays; I will always try to have your work back to you by the next class period. See schedule of work due for revision reminders. You are responsible for keeping track of these deadlines. You may not revise more than once. ALWAYS ATTACH THE ORIGINAL GRADED WORK TO THE REVISION. I will not read work without the originals. I will average the grades for the original and the revision. For SUBSTANTIAL revisions, I will count the higher grade.


SCHOLASTIC HONESTY/PLAGIARISM WARNING

I'm assuming that I will never have reason to doubt your honesty. But just so we're clear on what I consider plagiarism, I'll define it for you: misrepresenting as your own work any part of work done by another; submitting the same paper or substantially similar papers to meet the requirements of more than one course without the written approval and consent of all instructors concerned, depriving another student of necessary course materials; interfering with another's work. This is a serious offense and will be officially reported. Clear cases will result in the grade of F and appropriate academic discipline.


Schedule--Spring 1996

Note: all readings refer to Thill and Bovee, third edition. I will post assignment details to the class discussion list or web page.


Week 1
INTRODUCTION / DIRECT PLAN MESSAGES


Week 2
DIRECT PLAN MESSAGES


Week 3 NETSCAPE AND THE WORLD WIDE WEB--Meet in MAC lab (236 Stansbury)

Week 4 WEB ASSIGNMENT--DRAFTING


Week 5
EMPLOYMENT WRITING/RESEARCHING JOBS


Week 6
RESUMES


Week 7
COVER LETTERS


Week 8
INDIRECT PLAN MESSAGES


Week 9
INDIRECT PLAN MESSAGES


Week 10
PERSUASIVE MESSAGES


Week 11
REPORTS--PLANNING AND RESEARCH

Week 12



Week 13
REPORTS--PUTTING IT TOGETHER AND SUMMARIZING


Week 14
REVISING THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Week 15
NO CLASS ON 11/26 OR 11/28--THANKSGIVING RECESS

Week 16



THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM IN THIS CLASS


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